All posts tagged: Norooz

Bastani Sonati – Persian Saffron Ice Cream

Bastani Sonati – Persian Saffron Ice Cream

The temperatures have risen, and I am in the mood for a cooling ice cream. The golden Yellow Bastani Sonati – Persian Saffron Ice Cream is one of the most popular ice creams in Iran. Whether young or old, men or women, everyone loves Bastani Sonati – Persian Saffron Ice Cream. Bastani means ice cream, and Sonati is traditional, so translated, it means traditional Persian ice cream. Nothing is better in the heat than having the aromatic saffron ice cream melt in your mouth. In Bastani are little frozen pieces of cream and pistachio slivers hidden. As a child, and even today, I still get excited when I discover a tasty bite of delicious frozen cream or a slivered pistachio in the ice cream. HOMEMADE BASTANI SONATI Throughout Tehran, we have a lot of ice cream stores that sell Bastani, but many Persians also prepare it at home, as there is nothing better than fresh homemade Bastani. Last summer, I made saffron ice cream without eggs; today I have a recipe with eggs. In my …

Sabzi Polo – Persian Herb Rice سبزی پلو

Sabzi Polo – Persian Herb Rice سبزی پلو

Monday was the beginning of spring and the same time as our New Year Norooz. On this day, many dishes are prepared with fresh herbs traditionally, for example, Sabzi Polo – Persian Herb Rice سبزی پلو ، Sabzi Polo ba Mahi – Persian herb rice with orange stuffed trout, Kuku Sabzi – Persian Herb Frittata , Ashe Reshteh – noodle soup with herbs, and Sabzi Khordan – Persian herb platter. Sabzi means herbs, and polo means rice, that is herbed rice. Tender fresh herbs are the first signs of spring, and in my Sabzi Polo, chopped dill, parsley, cilantro, scallions, a whole bulb of garlic, ghee, and saffron add a delicious touch to the rice. As in many Persian dishes, the herbs in Sabzi Polo vary, and each family has its favorite recipe. Watch Video on Instagram

Chaharshanbeh Suri - The Persian Festival of Fire

Chaharshanbeh Suri – The Persian Festival of Fire

On the last Tuesday evening before the Persian New Year, we celebrate Chaharshanbeh Suri – The Persian Festival. Several rituals are performed on this fire festival to purify the body and mind. Chaharshanbeh means Wednesday, and Suri means light and also fire. In my childhood, this caused some confusion. Why is it called Wednesday and celebrated on Tuesday? It’s the last night to Wednesday before Norooz, the Persian New Year, a festival celebrated at the spring equinox. The Origin of this festival dates back to the Zoroastrian era based on the Tsarathustra’s beliefs. On this day, we celebrate the victory of light over darkness. After all, we are approaching the equinox in a few days. The Fire Festival is an announcement of spring and the revival of nature. Watch Video on Instagram 

Ghorabieh – Persian Almond Macaroons قرابیه

Ghorabieh – Persian Almond Macarons قرابیه

Nowrooz is coming, so let’s start thinking about Shirinipazi (baking cookies)! After all, we also have the ritual of baking cookies for Nowrooz as you do for Christmas. It’s about 6 Days from now to Monday, March 20 at 10:25 pm in Germany. I have some cookie recipes on my Blog for you for the holidays. For today, I have the recipe for gluten-free Ghorabieh – Persian Almond macaron قرابیه, a traditional treat from the city of Tabriz in northwestern Iran. Ghorabieh is a popular souvenir from Tabriz and is one of the most expensive cookies baked in Persia.

Shirini-e Ghifi - Persian Cream Horns شیرینی قیفی خامه ای

Shirini-e Ghifi – Persian Cream Horns شیرینی قیفی خامه ای

Shirini-e Ghifi – Persian Cream Horns شیرینی قیفی خامه ای are a fluffy treat and a simple pastry made from puff pastry. With this recipe, a touch of nostalgia for Nowrooz blows into your kitchen. The crispy baked Cream Horns are filled with creamy rosewater-vanilla-cream and melt in your mouth. The best part is that although they look sweet, they aren’t. They are slightly sweet and yet just irresistible. Serve them along with other sweets on holidays like Nowrooz and at weddings. They are easy and quick to make, and an eye-catcher on your festive table. If you’ve never tasted Cream Horns, you should do it! View Video on Instagram

Kuku Sabzi - Persian Herb Frittata کوکو سبزی

Kuku Sabzi – Persian Herb Frittata کوکو سبزی

Just eight more days to Norooz! I would love to know, what do you prepare for the Persian new years feast? For me and the most iranian people Kuku Sabzi – Persian Herb Frittata کوکو سبزی is an aromatic herbal omelet and is a Must-Eat at Norooz. Persian Kuku announces spring for the many green herbs included in as parsley, cilantro, dill, chives, spring onions, dried fenugreek leaves, ground walnuts, and barberries. The herbs symbolize rebirth and the eggs fertility. The red barberries give the Kuku Sabzi a slight sour taste. Imagine fragrant herbs wafting through your kitchen as you spend a quiet afternoon concocting the Persian herb frittata. Give this Persian vegetarian dish a try! View Video on Instagram

Norooz Sprouts

Norooz Sprouts

Sabzeh is a symbol of spring, a part of the Haft Sin for Norooz and symbolizes vivacity, liveliness and the beginning of new life, bursting from the seeds. Today I’ll show you how to start growing your own Sabzeh for Norooz, or Easter Grass for Easter, from lentils or wheat. We grow Sabzeh from different seeds some grow it from lentils, others from barley or mung beans. I like to grow Sabzeh from wheat seeds as to my eyes the green of wheat grass looks beautiful. Watch daily the seeds turn into beautiful green grass. You can grow Sabzeh Norooz Sprouts with or without soil. I’ll show you the version without soil. You will need some time in advance and should start 10 – 14 days before Norooz or Easter.